Girl In Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow

Girl In Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow
Release Date:  August 30, 2016
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Format: ARC
Genres: Young Adult Fiction, Contemporary
Ratings: Gut Punch Surprised Me characters

Trigger Warning: Discussion of self-harm, abuse

My Thoughts

This was one of the hardest books ever to read. Not because it wasn’t well written, but because it was and about a difficult topic. The novel is from the perspective of Charlotte “Charlie” Davis, who ended up in a hospital because of self-harm. She cut up her arms so badly, she almost died, but friends bring her to the hospital and then she is admitted to a psych hospital for girls. So the book starts in that hospital and is instantly heavy.

The author of the book also struggled with self-harm so it’s a very raw and real telling of what it’s like to cope with a mental illness. Charlie’s story is unique, but many of her thoughts are in line with what it’s like for anyone to deal with poor mental health.

Girl In Pieces deals with a range of tough topics aside from self-harm. Domestic violence, loss, love, homelessness, and abuse are among some of the areas brushed upon. All of it made my heart ache. Not because of the nature of the topics alone, but because of how incredibly well Glasgow brings Charlie to life. Her voice is clear and it’s loud. It’s Charlie’s unfiltered thoughts as she tries to navigate a world that has mostly just hurt her. She’s lost a father and a best friend. Her mother isn’t much of a mother. She finds herself in a damaging relationship. A hospital doesn’t magically heal her and she feels broken, but she’s trying to get better. As a reader you feel her pain deeply. You also feel her joy. You feel her hope and her hopelessness.

The world needs more books with a honest portrayal of mental illness. There’s nothing beautiful about it. There isn’t a magical cure. Girl In Pieces does well to show all of that. It doesn’t glamorize something horrible. There aren’t any sudden revelations. The book is about girl who is sick, but is still a girl trying to get by like anyone else. I have a feeling I’ll be carrying Charlie’s story with me forever.

Positives/Negatives
+ Realistic portrayal of mental illness/self-harm
+ The depiction of the sheer complexity of living
– Some little things that are spoilery

In Summary
This book is one of the rawest depictions of mental illness I’ve read. It doesn’t shy away from the ugliness of it all and it’s going to crush you a bit.

Note: An advanced copy of this book was provided free by the publisher for review consideration. This in no way influenced my opinion.

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