The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Release Date:  November 1, 2016
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Format: ARC
Genres: Young Adult Fiction, Contemporary, Romance
Ratings: I Ship It Too Cute fave2

The Basics

The Sun Is Also a Star is told in two perspectives, Natasha’s and Daniel’s. Natasha is a Jamaican immigrant who is set to be deported that night. While making one last attempt to save her family from being sent away from their home, she runs into Daniel. Daniel has an Ivy League interview he doesn’t want to go to set for later that day when he becomes curious about Natasha, who he spots swaying to music from her headphones.

The teenagers’ chance, or fated, meeting inspires poetic Daniel to convince scientific Natasha that falling in love is possible, by using an experiment he read about. This involves a list of personal questions that they both answer throughout the day. The result? You’ll have to read, but neither of them comes out of the experience unchanged.

My Thoughts

This book is massively cute, but also tackles larger issues. So if you want to get emotional, you’re going to get emotional. Adorable romance? Check. Time sensitive dilemma? Check. Contemporary societal problems? That, too.

Of course illegal immigration is one of the major problems this book represents. Natasha is facing having to leave her home and also her future behind, all because of the actions of others. And she’s determined to try to take control of her own life. Another side of immigration is shown through Daniel. His parents were Korean immigrants who left a hard life behind. So a lot of pressure is put on him and his brother. His aspirations are not in line with his parents’.

As a result, Natasha and Daniel are on opposite sides when it comes with how they view their futures. What’s in your control? Does fate exist? Their discussions lead them both to new perspectives. And that’s where this book’s magic is. Their differences are how the dynamic works. Natasha believes in the scientific method. Daniel is a dreamer and hopeless romantic. Reality falls somewhere in the middle. Their separate experiences weave together as they get to know each other and a complex portrait of simply being human comes out of it.

I loved every second of reading it. Yoon creates such vibrant characters and strays away from a generic love story. This simultaneously warmed my heart and tore it apart. It also caused me to think a lot about where I land on the fate vs. conicidence scale.

Positives/Negatives

+ Realistic look at immigration
+ Exploration of racism within communities
+ Depiction of difficulties in family life
+ Cuteness
+++ EVERYTHING

In Summary

This book is cute, but goes beyond just cuteness. Romantic moments will warm your heart, but it goes beyond that. Immigration, racism, fate, and love are all other areas Yoon’s story delves into. It’s a must read. While you’re at it, read Yoon’s debut Everything, Everything if you haven’t already.

Sidenote

Whether coincidence or fate, I decided to clean out my Pocket list and came across an article from January 2015 about the study this book references (and uses.) I have no recollection of saving it, but rediscovered it at the right time. It’s worth reading. Perhaps after you read The Sun Is Also a Star.

Note: An advanced copy of this book was provided free by the publisher for review consideration. This in no way influenced my opinion.

Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *