Into the Dim by Janet B. Taylor

dimInto the Dim by Janet B. Taylor
Release Date: March 1, 2016
Publisher: HMH Books
Format: ebook
Genres: Young Adult Fiction, SciFi, Fantasy, Historical Fiction, Romance
RatingsEnjoyable Page Turner

The Basics
Hope’s mother is dead. Or at least that’s what she thought when her mom was assumed dead at a disaster scene where she was supposed to be giving a lecture.  But when Hope’s aunt that she barely knows invites her to Scotland, she is told her mother is actually a time traveller and alive, just stranded in the past. Hope is needed as part of a team to go back in time to save her mother.

My Thoughts
A good way to get me to read a book is set it in Scotland. I went into this only knowing that Scotland and time travel were somehow involved. There was less Scotland than I would have liked, but despite being picky about time travel stories, I still found myself enjoying the book.

The story starts out slowly since a lot of set up is necessary. The reader gets a glimpse of Hope’s life and then learns about time travel along with her. There are some of the usual cliches. There’s the big secret of time travel Hope’s mom kept from her to protect her. She has been prepared her whole life for time traveling without knowing it (and her photographic memory helps.) She meets a mysterious boy she instantly falls for and she also doesn’t realize how beautiful she is. So smart and beautiful girl finds out family secret and meets a mysterious boy before she’s off on an adventure. A typical fantasy setup.

Thankfully the book expands a bit from there. Once the rescue mission gets going, the pace really picks up. I started to like the cast of characters more and needed to know what happened next. There are some unique aspects to how time travel works so it doesn’t feel entirely trite. The dire nature of the situation kept me engrossed in the book until I was finished.

Through all of the twists and turns, some of the character development got a little lost. Plenty of fun, witty dialogue and tough spots that reveal pieces of each character. However, this book really only provides an introduction to the time traveling crew so I didn’t feel truly attached to any characters. It was mostly the winding plot that kept me reading.

It wasn’t until the very end that things seemed to dig a little deeper. That of course is because there is going to be a second book. A lot happens in the last few chapters that leaves loose ends for a continuation. It wasn’t until everything was ending that I started to feel more for the characters. Hope and her friends started to feel more real and the romance became less hollow. Book two has the potential to be a much stronger novel.

Positives and Negatives
+ Second part of the book is fast paced, great setup for book two
– Characters felt a little shallow, took a little to become its own story

In Summary
Once the pace picks up, Into the Dim becomes a fun read that keeps you guessing. Some of the twists are predictable, while others sneak up on you. I didn’t start to feel invested in any characters until the story was ending which has me interested in reading the second book. The story didn’t blow me away and some of the aspects of the romance and time travel are typical, but I still found the story entertaining.

Note: An advanced copy of this book was provided free by the publisher for review consideration. This in no way influenced my opinion.

Share

Zeroboxer by Fonda Lee

I read this earlier this year and have been wanting to talk about it and it’s TIME. I’m into sports, but not so into boxing. However, if zero gravity boxing existed that might change things for me. How the book describes the sport is completely amazing. I became more engrossed in these fictional matches than I have been in many real life sporting events.

Aside from the awesomeness of futuristic sport, this book has a lot going for it. Here’s what I liked:

  • World Building: Lee does a fantastically well at building a complex world without over-explaining or making it confusing. I am not exactly well-read when it comes to Sci-Fi, but the world she creates is different than a lot of what I have read. I think the uniqueness of zero gravity boxing helps. There have been comparisons to Ender’s Game (which I love), but while there are some similarities I don’t find them truly comparable. Completely different tone, different message, and so on.
  • The Action: There is a lot of detailed action in this and it’s amazing. Sometimes I get bored with play-by-play fight scenes, but Lee makes them so tense and engrossing. God, do I wish this sport was real so I could watch it.
  • Characters: The story centers around zeroboxer Carr and his rise to fame. The book made me root for Carr, but not always entirely love him which is what I want from my MCs. I am drawn to characters who aren’t entirely lovable. Carr is adored by his fans and the general public, but not always lovable for his reader and it makes the story much more interesting.
  • The Sports World: What I liked most about this book is its subtle satire about the sports world and advertising. Carr is assigned a brandhelm (basically a publicist) Risha (who is beautiful and… you can see where this is going…). Carr is seen as marketable and gets a bunch of sponsorships. As someone who worked only briefly in sports, but got to see a glimpse of how this all works, I loved how Lee handled this. Branding – whether it’s a company or a person, in sports or elsewhere – is obviously a Big Deal in corporate America. So how Carr is treated is relevant. When I recently read about how Serena Williams doesn’t get as much sponsorship money as some of her counterparts, I instantly thought of this book. People become brands and it’s strange how that works in our world.
  • The Messages: Besides the publicity commentary, there are a few other things happening in this book that I won’t talk about to avoid spoiling anything. However, what’s nice about this book is the story isn’t over-burdened by these many ideas. The plot is first and foremost about Carr and his conflicts. The questions are there and they don’t necessarily have answers. The book delivers the action-packed fun but also gives you a few things to chew on if you wish.

I think the one negative of Zeroboxer for me is the characters didn’t feel fully developed. Carr of course comes far by the end, but I wanted more in the beginning with him and Risha and a few other characters. The character relationships didn’t feel as strong as they could have been.

If you enjoy Sci-Fi and/or sports you should definitely read this book. Even if you don’t enjoy some of its commentary, it’s still so much fun. And if you don’t like Sci-Fi or sports, this might temporarily win you over.

Share